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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)
the director of environment is here and car sharing organizations are here as well, we're happy to answer questions. >> i have a couple questions. going back to that [speaker not understood] that you have up on the implementation of the timeline -- excuse me -- i was wondering if there are any specifics that you could also queue us on what is exactly legislative changes could possibly be. it might be too early for you to expand on this particular question. my second question is looking at one-way car sharing in implementation. >> yes. so, on the first question, i don't think we know yet if we would need legislative changes. as we finish the evaluation of the on-street, if there are things we need to tweak from the approvals the mta and the board of supervisors already granted in divisions 1 and 2 of the transportation code, we'll bring those forward. those changes authorize not just a pilot, but authorize a change in law for an ongoing program. so, it may be that we don't need anything else legislatively to happen. but if we do, we would bring that early 2013 if we finalize our revised po
district's environment. i am also concerned about the economic health of our city and the seemingly recollectless spending that gets approved annually by the board of supervisors all at the expense of you, the taxpayers. currently we are exceeding $7 billion being passed routinely without an objection from the board. the city civil grand jury reported if rising pension costs are not addressed quickly the city's financial health will be jeopardized and leveraged out to generations to come. if elected i will make sure our future budgets remain balanced without cutting public services or benefits, privatizing our parks and other public resources, replacing additional burdens on the taxpayers. part of my commitment to making san francisco a compassionate city to live in is my proposal to establish animal adoption centers so every homeless pet has a second chance and being found a loving and safe home. for those pets that can't be found good homes, i would propose creating city-run pet sanctuaries so that every pet has a safe place to live, thrive, and be cared for. i also propose making
. if you are especially in a marine or water environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and th
. second, to discuss with sfmta and the department of the environment, director, thanks for being here, on what your objectives are and strategies are for expanding car sharing into neighborhoods. and third, have a thoughtful discussion with departments and stakeholders hereof a possibility of implementing one-way car sharing programs here in san francisco. so, with that very short introduction, i'd like to bring up sfmta for their presentation. please hold your applause for the end. >> supervisor wiener, did you have a comment? supervisor wiener. >> thank you, and thank you, supervisor cohen, for calling a hearing on this very important subject, specifically car sharing. and i agree that it's extremely important that we provide car-sharing access in all parts of the city. and thankfully, particularly for those areas that are poorly served by other forms of transportation such as muni and taxicab service. and we do know that in some areas of the city, in particular districts 10 and 11, muni access is not as good as it is in other parts of the city, and cab access, taxicab access is at
, please. >> item no. 3, resolution retroactively authorizing the department of environment to spend a grant in the amount of $2,977,000 from the california public utilities commission through pacific gas & electric company to continue with an energy use and demand reduction through energy-efficiency program in the city and county of san francisco for the period of october 15th, 2012 through december 31, 2012. >> mr. rodriguez, welcome. >> thank you, guillermo rodriguez, department of the environment. the department is requesting the committee's approval to accept and expend a grant in the amount of $2,977,000 from the california public utilities commission through pacific gas & electric company to continue an energy use and demand reduction through energy-efficiency program through the period of october 15 of this year through december 31 of this year. it working cooperatively with pg&e and additional funding is being allocated to the city to accelerate approximately 450 businesses and multi-family projects totaling about 3 million megawatts in savings. the savings of the 450 proj
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
'm going to walk through. i am joined by melanie, director of department of environment. there are other representatives from the mta department of environment city administrator's office, car sharing organization. we're certainly working along with all of them, working side by side with the department of environment in particular in making sure that the policy is advancing both our transportation and environmental goals, which i believe car sharing is a good example of that. so, if we could go to the presentation, i'm just going to try to walk through briefly some basics to help stimulate the conversation and answer some of the questions that you raised in your opening statement, supervisor cohen. so, car sharing does have a definition currently in the transportation code. this is it. i won't spend time on this, but just want to frame at least from the transportation code, current perspective of what the definition of car sharing is. and this largely is in line with the more traditional car sharing models and this is how the code currently defines it. so, i think you've already started
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
michael bloomberg endorsed president obama citing his support for the environment. just days before the election, bloomberg announced his decision in an op-ed entitled, "a vote for president, a vote for a president to lead on climate change the." riding -change." he compared the records of obama and mitt romney but he wrote -- bloomberg's endorsement is particularly striking because much of the news media has barely mentioned climate change, even in the lead up or aftermath of the superstorm. there were also no questions addressed to the presidential candidates on climate change in the course of the three presidential debates. also, mayor bloomberg was a republican who turned independent. one of the news outlets that has broken the silence on climate change is the magazine "bloomberg businessweek." the cover story is called, "it's global warming, stupid." to talk more about the issue, we areoined by the author, paul barrett, assistant managing editor at bloomberg businessweek. it is great to see. lay out this article, "it's global warming, stupid." >> good morning. what we've tried
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the time y
% and brutal in any environment and especially when other budgets hasn't been slashed as much, and understanding it might upset the apple cart so to speak, but i don't think we can be afraid of that in g we have to innovate. to some degree and maybe your department faces a challenge and labeled innovation capital of the world, however you want to label it and in the center of technology globally and i think we are expected to innovate. so what are some of the things that have to happen? what environments do you have to see -- let's say it's a centralization issue. what are issues that have to take place to have that dialogue happening? to me as i read through the report and i don't know about you president chiu, there seems to be an issue here. and progress is being made and that is great but is it fast enough? when i tell people i am on lotus notes for email it's a round laughter all along and what needs to take place. >> let me say two things about the conversation and let me put it out there how i perceive the comments and the reports and supervisor your comments. number
security and begin to undo the damage that our current water system does to the environment. the plan would then be brought back to the voters in 2016 for their aprafl or disapproval so it's placing the city on a trajectory we're not currently on. we don't recycle any water, we've abandoned most ground water since hetch hetchy became available and we've done real damage to the tuolome river and we begin it's time to get in line with the city's values. it's a plan the voters ultimately get to approve. >> i disagree. i think proposition f is about one thing and one thing only, about forcing the city to spend $8 million dollars to conduct a plan that would require us to drain hetch hetchy reservoir at a cost of anywhere between 3 and 10 billion dollars that gets translated to our rate payers at anywhere between $2,000 and $2700 per year per rate payer. this is a proposal largely hoisted upon san franciscoans by outsiders. not one san francisco organization supports this measure. every group from san francisco tomorrow to the republican party across the political spectrum opposes us
strength, which is new york's coastal environment, that's what made new york new york, right? new york harbor, hudson river, to the erie canal, and you were out west. that was new york. what made manhattan manhattan was the underground infrastructure. that engineering marvel. once you now say, well, that can flood, and you can't even find a way to pump out the water, you take the greatest asset and you make it a liability. and it's a frightening premise to deal with, you know? i think that's one of the reasons why denial is so much easier. because once you say, yes, extreme weather is here to say, we have to redesign this environment environment, well that's a big undertaking and it's threatening to many. i think that's where we are. >> can new york city escape the sort of national flurosis? it's a fight on the national level. out of necessity, can new york state and new york city lead on this issue because we have to, even if the rest of the country isn't ready to arrive at any consensus and make any big national decisions? >> we're going to try. you know, what we practice in new york
your portfolio and making sure you're in sthooks can outperform in a rising interest rate environment-- which is another thing we're worried about-- longer term makes some sense. >> tom: so rising interest rate environment, possibly higher inflation, higher taxes. not exactly the most shiny of forecasts for investors. >> well, there is something you can do about it. you can avoid that tax drag by maximizing your investments in qualified plans. you can keep up with modest inflation by making sure you have your asset allocation mix right. inflation really picks the pocket of the bond investor, but dividend paying stocks and dividends of the markets can keep up with a modestly rising inflation environment. we have seen dividend increases some in the s & p this year and we have seen it as sigh sign of confidence in the management and we think they will put the cash to work once the uncertainty of the election is out. >> energy is one of the stowks like, traditionally a dividend area. but the price of energy stocks has gotten hit lately. >> it has. sectors underperformed but the balance sh
rate environment-- which is another thing we're worried about-- longer term makes some sense. >> tom: so rising interest rate environment, possibly higher inflation, higher taxes. not exactly the most shiny of forecasts for investors. >> well, there is something you can do about it. you can avoid that tax drag by maximizing your investments in qualified plans. you can keep up with modest inflation by making sure you have your asset allocation mix >> allocation mix right. inflation picks the pocket of the bond investor. but dividends can keep up with a modestly rising inflationary environment. this is the test, this is a test. this is a test. this is a test. that cashe a nice source of income for income-oriented investors. >> tom: health care meantime, continues to march higher, despite uncertainties regarding the election. what do you wait this? >> we like health care. it's actually done quite well, but their balance sheets are in great shape. there are uncertainties factored into price of the stock. we see great risk-reward there and again a sector where you might be able to get bot
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
and the environment of protection agency says ken kia -- hyundai and have been overestimating their gas efficiency for years. s must nowaker retrofit the window stickers on cars and reduce their s of 2 6 miles per gallon depending on their model. tookal estate executives pay high-tech tour of arlington theand never had to leave city. was meant to take a in- the projects happening in the city in the coming months. for more than one man -- one month, one man sat in a rowboat pacific ocean. what he says he gained from exper [ earnest ] out of the blue one day, we were told to build a 30-foot stage. gathered the guys and we built that 30-foot stage, not knowing what it was for. just ds later, althree shifts were told to assemble inin the warehous. a group of people walked out on that stage and told us that the plant is now closed and all of you areedired... i looked both ways, i looked at the crowd, and...we all just lost ours. jo. we don't have an income. mitt romney made over 100 million dollars by shutting down our plant and devasted our lives. turns out that when we built that stage, it was like b
for over 400 years. it is a very urban environment. it is not like some of the areas for long island and recent histories with houses way out onto beach territory. some of them situated. it is not the kind of island environment where you think of yourselves as having ocean on the sides and i was born and raised here on staten island and so were my mom and dad. staten island has had a feeling of what you had said. the complete opposite. there was never a threat. people never thought that there would be problems with the tides. here on staten island. and i think that is what caught a lot of people off guard here on staten island was that we never thought something like this could happen. we do have many beautiful houses and beautiful community that is are on the coast lines of our island. and we never thought there would be a problem like this. and i think that caught a lot of people off guard. >> michael cusik thank you very much for joining us tonight. tomorrow night, msnbc will host a concert and telethon to raise money for the american red cross relief efforts. you can see it right
rammed city, the free farm stand, to growing home community garden as well as garden for the environment, raise the roof, the little city garden, [speaker not understood], please touch community garden, eco sf school farm at the school of the arts, the veggie table at third and pa lou, the treasure island [speaker not understood], the farm that recently got together at the has valley playground and hayes valley farm. we recognize that successful communities are a part of a sustainable environment. we recognize our responsibility to all the relationships that make -- and we will make decisions with all of these thoughts in mind as our integral communities include our volunteers, our supporters, our partners, and the folks who live right around us. >> i'm sorry, but the other one gets two minutes. so, we may call you back up afterwards to have you finish your statement. but we have to sort of -- >>> i want to thank the general opportunity for community input, for community participation and for neighborhood feedback. >> we're with you completely. we'll call you back up if you need to finis
as well as well as working on parks. so in the environment i need to tell everyone, that muni is a priority, without muni the city will come to a stand still and it is not working properly right now. other cities can do transit systems even with snow and terrible weather, and san francisco can't. we need to fix it. i've worked in the green jobs area. i have helped push through go solar sf, which has created hundreds of jobs in san francisco and i need to do more of that for the citizens of san francisco. i will close with the idea that san francisco and district five in particular need a hard-working supervisor who has a stable background and a proven track record of making hard decision and getting things done. and i'm that person. >> hi, my name is thea starby and i am asking you to make me your next district five supervisor. as a long time neighborhood activist, i am able to speak and more importantly listen to people from all walks of life and all, professions. >> i have gotten these groups to talk and listen to each other. i have got involved in politics after 2007 double
money in this environment. what do you do? is this a buying opportunity? >> not particularly. you have to look at the technical indicators and see where we're going see a breakdown. i would be putting no money to work right new. because of this election, if we see romney elected, we'll see oil prices drop. you'll see energy prices drop. that might be a buying opportunity at that point. other than that, i really believe we have to just take a look and see attitude right now. >> well, one of our guests, a regular on this program, had a great idea. he said to me, maybe for one month the fed instead of putting that $40 billion of mortgage-backed securities buying, put that on hold and send it to some of the ravaged areas like staten island, like new jersey. >> i love it. i absolutely love that idea. >> i do too. >> then the fed's crossing the line into fiscal policy and out of the realm of monetary policy. >> where are we going to get it? >> fema responds rather adroitly to -- katrina notwithstanding, to these disasters. i suspect they're going to be quite responsive right now for those wh
that switch backs are valid and necessary given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informed and would further denigate service and safety. the jury answers, "that's what we're getting at that muni think it is switch backs are a normal way of business". other transportation systems were aghast, appalled that a transit system could inconvenience their customers so cavalierly and we want them to have the feeling that we are doing a good job" when they deem them unavoidable. recommendation two, contact and learn from paris not resorting to switchbacks regularly. muni agrees there is room for improvement and they will reach out to their peers to study their standard operating procedures but note the claim that others are using procedures similar to muni. the jury answers "the jury approves part of the response about contacting peers. we hope that you contact th
, in many cases i believe it's related to the environment. and some of the issues that they're exposed to. and, so, i think it's critical that we start to look at people who are struggling in a more compassionate way. so, since i've been supervisor, one of the organizations that -- community-based organizations that i've been very impressed by is the west side community services. i think that the -- (applause) >> there are a lot of communities, communities of color. they still have stigma attached to that name, mental health. so, it's really incredible that these individuals in this agency that's run currently by dr. jones who does pretty incredible work in the community in the western addition. (applause) >> that, you know, that they provide culturally competent services. and, so, the person that we're honoring today is it a willis. she's the program coordinator from west side community services in the western edition. tia wallace has been faithfully and compassionately working with children youth and their familiesates west side community services for 12 years. * as the program coordina
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
. >> it was high noon at the chancellor's office in berlin. demonstrators give the environment minister a petition with 100,000 signatures calling for germany to stick to its energy policy, phasing out nuclear and boosting renewals, but the minister says the switch must not be too expensive. >> it is also true that the costs have to be affordable for the economy, for individual citizens, entrepreneurs, artisans, small business people, and the middle classes. >> one week ago, all 16 of germany's federal states pledged to support the government's federal energy strategy. the chancellor was encouraged to see politicians come together across party lines. am i think at our meeting today, everyone understood that the task ahead is huge and that everyone must do their part. >> offshore when parks was a major topic of friday's meeting of federal and state leaders -- offshore wind parks. it is a subject close to the heart of germany's coastal states. >> the tenor of the meeting is that we should organize one big plan, not 16 little ones forming a whole. so we feel good about today. >> the chancellor did no
to acclimate to their new environment. again, sir, let's do this for the kids. and for those of you who want to help the kids or anyone else, please go to redcross.org and give generously. together we can overcome this disaster. also, the hurricane. we'll be right back. (cheers and applause) (cheers and applause) welcome back, everybody, thank you very much. my guest tonight became the face of equal pay for women. tonightly pay her just as much attention as i pay my male guests. please welcome lilly ledbetter. (cheers and applause) ms. ledbetter, thank you so much for coming on. what a pleasure to have you on here. >> thank you, it's my pleasure to be here. >> stephen: where are you from originally? >> alabama. >> stephen: how long have you been in new york this week? >> since sunday. >> stephen: okay, perfect time to visit the city. >> absolutely. >> stephen: wonderful. did we bring you here? >> you did, i've been in three hotel this is week. >> stephen: how many? >> three. >> stephen: why did you move? >> well, the first one got evicted and -- evacuated because of the crane -- >> oh, the d
. small businesses are taxed at 35%. that is not sustainable in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a -- these problems create an impediment to congress meant -- an impediment to commerce. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural in
at the cia outpost it the security environment degraded suddenly. there was an agreement to formal weekly meet to go discuss the security environment. in the longer term we believe formal location with the annex will greatly improve our security situation. moving the consulate operations to the ci operations might not have ultimately saved the lives of the four americans, including ambassador chris stevens. the annex came under fire in the second wave of attacks and it former navy seals died defending their colleagues there. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> early voting set to wrap up tomorrow notice crucial battleground state of florida." but the lines are so long some are asking for an extension. the florida league of women's votes say the wait could discourage people from voting at all. the florida's governor said he's not budging. phil is in florida are. it is my understanding the governor is also calling for an extension? >> the early voting line here in miami, dade county, just to showcase one location, has been three and a half hours long all day long today. the line still sits
to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
have an environment in whichhe srms are going to be more intense. >> rose: look at the lessons. where do you put the three or four most important lessons we need to learn from this. >> when you talk about what are you going to do about coastal cities, what sort of defenses will you put in place if you want to have a city like manhan that's right on the coast, it's at sea level. can we not have that many people living close to the sea. we have almost 4 million americans living a if few feet of high tide. is it right to be insuring that kind of property as well. we also have to think about climate change. we can argue endlessly really and scientists do over exactly how much climate change plays what role with weather. but we know enough to take steps to deal with it. we know enough to have a plan in place to reduce carbon emissions over time. we don't have absolute certainly in foreign policy and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayorpoind to, carbon attacks or maybe able to measure carbon standards. where
on that. >> why is that? >> many economists have done research to show that when there's an environment that is actually attractive for businesses and tax rates are lower, when you broaden the base and lower the rate, that you actually make an environment for business that encourages them to actually put heads on the payroll. add jobs. >> i would like to say mitt romney is not broadening the base. he's simply lowering the rate. what it really is giving back to people in hopes it will trickle down. what the congressional research said and what the republicans have pushed back on is it didn't work. the george bush administration is seven years of empirical evidence that that does not work as an economic program. >> do you think, andy, this latest jobs number changes the trajectory of the election on tuesday? >> i think it just firms up people's understanding and the consumer confidence number, i think, is really important as well. things are getting better, slower than we want. we need to do more. i do think it firms up people's belief we can have four more years. >> probably up until hur
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 122 (some duplicates have been removed)